Example
PILLAR, 2013 </br> 24×30 cm, tempera on panel STAIRS, 2013 </br> 30×40 cm, tempera on panel CABLES, 2013 </br> 40×40 cm, oil on panel CABLES 2, 2013 </br> 40×40 cm, oil on panel RECESS, 2014 </br> 30×24 cm, tempera on canvas CHURCH, 2014 </br> 30×20 cm, tempera on panel NICHE, 2014 </br> 30×24 cm, tempera on panel GALLERY, 2013 </br> 70×100 cm, tempera on canvas INK, 2014 </br> 30×24 cm, tempera on panel BASE, 2014 </br> 50×70 cm, tempera on panel CHURCH, 2014 </br> 92×73 cm, oil on canvas WINDOW, 2014 </br> 50×100 cm, tempera on panel BACK, 2014 </br> 50×70 cm, tempera on panel PERPECTIVE, 2014 </br> 24×30 cm, tempera on canvas FLOORING, 2014 </br> 40×30 cm, tempera on panel CEILING, 2014 </br> 50×70 cm, tempera on panel PILLARS, 2014 </br> 40×50 cm, tempera on panel RED FLOOR, 2014 </br> 50×40 cm, tempera on panel LECTORIUM, 2014 </br> 30×24 cm, tempera on panel DETAIL, 2014 </br> 50×40 cm, tempera on panel DOOR, 2014 </br> 30×40 cm, tempera on panel CHURCH 3, 2014 </br> 20×30 cm, tempera on panel CHURCH 4, 2014 </br> 50×40 cm, tempera on panel HOLE, 2014 </br> 40×50 cm, tempera on panel
Goce Smilewski, in his fictional biography of Spinoza, puts in the head of the latter the following confession: “I started to be fond of corners, they would attract me irresistible (…) wherever we happened to be, I would choose a point where three lines come together”.

Mystical potential of architecture, hidden in an abstract order of simple solids, rhythms and symmetry, is revealed perfectly by narrow frames - fragments. I try to make these details autonomic, despite their fragmentariness.
I call this architecture “semi” not only because it depicts just sections, but also because of the size – the majority of the works are small, what makes the monumental originals become intimate spaces where one feels safely isolated from nature, both physically and mentally.

A similar ambience prevails in humble, apparently commonplace, and as a matter of fact, full of ascetic charm Pieter Saenredam's painterly perspectives. Saenredam, almost contemporary to Spinoza, seemed to share with the latter, a particular fondness of right angles.