Example
SKULL, 2016 </br> 80×100 cm, tempera on canvas SKULL, 2016 </br> 24×30 cm, tempera on panel SKULL, 2017 </br> 24×30 cm, tempera on canvas SKULL, 2016 </br> 30×40 cm, tempera on canvas SKULL, 2017 </br> 30×21 cm, tempera on canvas SKULL, 2017 </br> 40×30 cm, tempera on panel SKULL, 2017 </br> 30×24 cm, tempera on panel SKULL, 2017 </br> 30×24 cm, tempera on canvas SKULL, 2017 </br> 40×30 cm, tempera on canvas ABSTRACT, 2017 </br> 30×24 cm, tempera on canvas SKULL, 2017 </br> 30×21 cm, tempera on canvas SKULL, 2016 </br> 30×40 cm, tempera on canvas SKULL, 2017 </br> 24×30 cm, tempera on canvas SKULL, 2017 </br> 24×30 cm, tempera on panel
Le Corbusier called a man a geometrical animal. Saenredam's church interiors, cleared of figuration according to the assumptions of Protestantism, compared with the interiors of Modernist gallery reveal their various, not only visual relations. It has been long since ambitions of modern abstraction to compensate religious needs was first noticed. While Early Modern religious art tending towards literature was based on narrative and persuasiveness, iconoclasm and constructivism resign from both of these qualities, aiming to rehabilitate what Renaissance left for the crafts: geometry and non-objectivity. Having noticed this, Gottfried Boehm points to a paradoxical relation between metaphysics and applied art: Modernist geometrical abstraction has always been disguised in temple facades and floors.